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Australasian Journal of Educational Technology

Jan 01, 2004 Volume 20, Number 3

Editors

Eva Heinrich; Michael Henderson; Petrea Redmond

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Table of Contents

Number of articles: 11

  1. An instrument to support thinking critically about critical thinking in online asynchronous discussions

    Elizabeth Murphy & Elizabeth Murphy

    This paper reports on the creation of an instrument for use by instructors, students, or researchers to identify, measure or promote critical thinking (CT) in online asynchronous discussions (OADs)... More

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  2. Classroom computer climate, teacher reflections and 're-envisioning' pedagogy in Australian schools

    Margaret Robertson, Andrew Fluck, Ivan Webb, Barton Loechel & Barton Loechel

    Considerable resources have been committed to providing information and communication technology in Australian schools. However, little is known about their effects on professional practice and... More

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  3. Relationship between learning outcomes and online accesses

    Pannee Suanpang, Peter Petocz, Anna Reid & Anna Reid

    This paper reports on a study carried out in Thailand investigating the relationship between students' use of an e-learning system and their learning outcomes in a course on Business Statistics.... More

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  4. Computer skills development by children using 'hole in the wall' facilities in rural India

    Parimala Inamdar

    Earlier work often referred to as the "hole in the wall" experiments has shown that groups of children can learn to use public computers on their own. This paper presents the method and results of ... More

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  5. A spreadsheet based simulator for experiential learning in production management

    Chuda Basnet & John Scott

    This paper presents a spreadsheet based simulation game for teaching and learning production management concepts of forecasting, material requirements planning, order review and release. In this... More

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  6. A study of educational technology project management in Australian universities

    John Kenny

    The development of quality learning materials using new technology requires the use of a wide range of skills beyond those possessed by many academic staff. Obtaining quality online learning... More

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  7. E-learning compared with face to face: Differences in the academic achievement of postgraduate business students

    Richard Ladyshewsky

    The use of information technology in higher education has increased significantly over the years. There is a paucity of controlled research which examines differences in electronic learning (EL)... More

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  8. A spreadsheet based simulator for experiential learning in production management

    Chuda Basnet & John Scott

    This paper presents a spreadsheet based simulation game for teaching and learning production management concepts of forecasting, material requirements planning, order review and release. In this... More

    pp. 275-294

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  9. E-learning compared with face to face: Differences in the academic achievement of postgraduate business students

    Rick Ladyshewsky

    The use of information technology in higher education has increased significantly over the years. There is a paucity of controlled research which examines differences in electronic learning (EL)... More

    pp. 316-336

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  10. Computer skills development by children using 'hole in the wall' facilities in rural India

    Parimala Inamdar

    Earlier work often referred to as the "hole in the wall" experiments has shown that groups of children can learn to use public computers on their own. This paper presents the method and results of... More

    pp. 337-350

    View Abstract
  11. A study of educational technology project management in Australian universities

    John Kenny

    The development of quality learning materials using new technology requires the use of a wide range of skills beyond those possessed by many academic staff. Obtaining quality online learning... More

    pp. 388-404

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