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Browsing by Subject: Games

  1. On the usability and likeability of virtual reality games for education: The case of VR-ENGAGE

    Maria Virvou & George Katsionis

    Computers & Education Vol. 50, No. 1 (January 2008) pp. 154–178

    Educational software games aim at increasing the students’ motivation and engagement while they learn. However, if software games are targeted to school classrooms they have to be usable and... More

    pp. 154-178

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  2. Making games in the classroom: Benefits and gender concerns

    Judy Robertson

    Computers & Education Vol. 59, No. 2 (September 2012) pp. 385–398

    This paper argues that making computer games as part of a classroom project can develop a range of new media storytelling, visual design and audience awareness skills. This claim is supported by... More

    pp. 385-398

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  3. Adventure games in education: A review

    Beth Cavallari, John Heldberg, Barry Harper & Barry Harper

    Australasian Journal of Educational Technology Vol. 8, No. 2 (Jan 01, 1992)

    This paper details an investigation into the educational applicability of adventure games. Adventure games are defined and their characteristics analysed. Those making claims about the educational ... More

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  4. Game Programming Course - Creative Design and Development

    Jaak Henno; Hannu Jaakkola, Tampere University of Technology, Pori

    International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET) Vol. 3, No. 2008 (Jul 16, 2008)

    Rapid developments of the Electronic Entertainment - computer and video games, virtual environments, the "Games 3.0" revolution - influences also courses about Games and Virtual Environments. In... More

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  5. Creative Learning with Serious Games

    Aristides Protopsaltis, Serious Games Institute-Coventry University; Lucia Pannese, Imaginary srl; Sonja Hetzner, University of Erlangen-Nuremberg; Dimitra Pappa, National Centre for Scientific Research â??Demokritos; Sara de Freitas, Serious Games Institute-Coventry University

    International Journal of Emerging Technologies in Learning (iJET) Vol. 5, No. 2010 (Mar 23, 2010)

    This paper, summarises the Creative Learning with Serious Games workshop that took place in the Fun and Games 2010 conference. The workshop discussed innovative methodological approaches to Serious... More

  6. AdventureCode: Computational Thinking Through Games

    Jaelle Scheuerman, Iowa State University, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1832–1837

    Computational thinking is a skill that is important in nearly all careers today, yet it is not often taught to elementary school aged children. Young children regularly interact with technology, so... More

    pp. 1832-1837

  7. Connecting Game and Instructional Design Through Development

    Matthew Boyer, Clemson University, United States; Mete Akcaoğlu, Georgia Southern University, United States; Silvia Pernsteiner, Knowledge One, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1641–1650

    The challenge when creating digital game-based learning applications is to simultaneously consider and satisfy theory and practice in the fields of both game and instructional design in order to... More

    pp. 1641-1650

  8. Issues and Opportunities in Learning with Social Impact Video Games

    Emily Sheepy, Educational Technology Graduate Program, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada; Renee Jackson, Educational Studies Graduate Program, Concordia University, Montreal, Canada

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1317–1322

    During this interactive roundtable session, participants will be invited to play and discuss the social impact game Get Water!, a game developed to bring awareness to the issue of water scarcity... More

    pp. 1317-1322

  9. The New Space Challenge: A game-based professional development program for staff teaching in new generation learning spaces

    David Cameron & Carol Miles, Centre for Teaching and Learning, University of Newcastle, Australia

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 1139–1141

    The New Space Challenge is a staff development approach specifically designed to enhance student learning experiences in the new generation of learning spaces being developed at the University of ... More

    pp. 1139-1141

  10. World of Warcraft as a Social Media Space: The Role of Game Chat

    Chareen Snelson, Boise State University, Department of Educational Technology, United States

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 445–450

    This paper presents findings from a first-stage analysis of live public chat extracted from the World of Warcraft as part of a larger virtual ethnography study in progress. Chat logs were collected... More

    pp. 445-450

  11. Intellectual Disability Pupil’s Perception about Using Technology within Special Education School in Sultanate of Oman

    Sahar El Shourbagi, sultan Qaboos University, Oman

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 232–238

    Actually, technology is more and more used among education area. In Middle East, research on technology in relation to disability is rare. This research aimed to investigate the perspective of... More

    pp. 232-238

  12. Survive with Vuvu in the Vaal: Conceptualizing, designing and developing a Serious Game for first year statistics students at the Vaal Triangle Campus

    Verona Leendertz, Fitchart Lizanne & Booth Martin, North-West University, South Africa

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 93–103

    This paper reports the conceptualization, design, and development of a first prototype of a serious game for first year statistics students at the Vaal Triangle Campus of the North-West University ... More

    pp. 93-103

  13. Examining Chocolate-Covered Broccoli: Eyetracking Evaluation of the ExMan Serious Game

    Seugnet Blignaut, Gordon Matthew & Chrisna Botha-Ravyse, North-West University, South Africa

    EdMedia + Innovate Learning 2015 (Jun 22, 2015) pp. 28–37

    Engaging users to playtest serious games during game design uncovers the value of design elements that contribute towards learning and fun during gameplay. During a first wire-frame test of the... More

    pp. 28-37

  14. Learners’ Perspectives of the Mobile Serious Game for Training Inexperienced Disaster Responders

    Didin Wahyudin & Shinobu Hasegawa, Japan Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Japan

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1639–1646

    This paper reports a survey conducted to investigate learners’ perspectives of a mobile serious game for training. It aimed to collect preliminary information about participants who will be... More

    pp. 1639-1646

  15. Engaging the NetGeneration Through the Use of Simulated Games in Both Traditional and E-Learning Settings

    Stephen Hammel, Nina Sarkar & Christina Manzo, Queensborough Community College, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1488–1492

    Today’s students are digital natives and have grown up with computer technology and video games. Their constant exposure to the Internet and other digital media shapes and influences how they... More

    pp. 1488-1492

  16. Game Me! What Pre-Service Teachers Should Know About Gaming and Gamification

    Lorraine Beaudin, University of Lethbridge, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1218–1221

    In the last several years, educators have seen an increased awareness and interest in using gaming in the classroom. This paper provides a brief overview of some of the benefits of gaming and... More

    pp. 1218-1221

  17. An E-portfolio System to Promote Development of Gaming Instructional Materials for Cultivating Students’ Problem-solving Abilities

    Toshiki Matsuda, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1142–1149

    This research examines ways to support efficient development of gaming instructional materials based on Figure 1 in each subject area. The basic policy of support is to offer basic dialog templates... More

    pp. 1142-1149

  18. Serious Games: Learner Assessment in Serious Game Design, a Framework for Assessment Metric Identification and Integration in the Game Mechanic

    Ilenius Ildephonce, Department of Computing - University of West Indies, Mona., Jamaica; Ezra Mugisa & Claudine Allen, Department of Computing - University of West Indies, Mona, Jamaica

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 1115–1121

    Serious game design ignores the fact that learning and assessment go hand in hand. One learns by knowing he has learned and there has to be a measure to ascertain that learning has occurred and to ... More

    pp. 1115-1121

  19. An Experimental Study of the Effect of Online Math Games on Student Performance and Engagement

    Lisa Suarez-Caraballo, Xiongyi Liu, Marius Boboc & Selma Koc, Cleveland State University, United States

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 940–945

    The purpose of this experimental study was to examine the effect of playing competitive online math games on high school students’ engagement and performance in adding integers. Three Algebra 1... More

    pp. 940-945

  20. Can Serious Games Prevent Plagiarism?

    Cheryl Kier, Athabasca University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2015 (Oct 19, 2015) pp. 818–822

    Plagiarism has become a big concern for educators. Despite numerous attempts to prevent plagiarism, it remains a challenge. The current study evaluated the effectiveness of a plagiarism education... More

    pp. 818-822