You are here:

When Computer-Supported Collaboration Means Computer-Supported Competition: Professional mediation as a model for collaborative learning
Article

, University of Wisconsin-Madison, United States

Journal of Interactive Learning Research Volume 15, Number 2, ISSN 1093-023X Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper analyzes collaboration in a computer-supported learning environment based on the professional practices of mediation and dispute resolution. In so doing, it explores the nature of collaborative learning in a setting marked by competition as much as cooperation. Interviews with students suggest that the processes of collaborative learning in this competitive environment were fundamentally similar to collaborative learning processes observed in more cooperative contexts (e.g., Hutchins, 1995). Individual learners assumed roles that mapped to important elements of the conceptual domain. Learners developed understanding through feedback on their own role from peers, and by observing their peers enact roles that represented alternative facets of the domain under study. The cognitive processes of computer-supported collaborative learning thus appear similar whether students are working toward more shared or more conflicting goals.

Citation

Shaffer, D.W. (2004). When Computer-Supported Collaboration Means Computer-Supported Competition: Professional mediation as a model for collaborative learning. Journal of Interactive Learning Research, 15(2), 101-115. Norfolk, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2019 from .

Keywords

References

View References & Citations Map

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. Signed in users can suggest corrections to these mistakes.

Suggest Corrections to References