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Teaching Thinking and Problem Solving with Technology PROCEEDINGS

, University of Central Florida

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, ISBN 978-1-880094-25-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The need to teach students to think is not a new idea in American education. Early in this century Dewey (1910) along with other educators called for making the teaching of thinking a goal of formal education. In 1982, the Education Commission of the States concluded that higher order thinking processes should be the “basics” of education (Education Commission of the States, 1982). Robert Sternberg, a leading educator, has asserted that the teaching of thinking should be . . . “the first order of business for school” (Quimby, 1985, p. 53).

Citation

Allen, K.W. (1997). Teaching Thinking and Problem Solving with Technology. In J. Willis, J. Price, S. McNeil, B. Robin & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1997--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 760-762). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 14, 2018 from .

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References

  1. Allen, K.W. (1990). The Effect of Teaching a Matrix Strategy on the Solving of Deductive Matching Problems by Sixth Graders. Unpublished doctoral dissertation. University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC.
  2. Allen, K.W. (1995). Technology and diversity: The role of preservice education. Florida Technology in Education Quarterly. 7(2), 40-49.
  3. Allen, K.W., Hutchinson, C.J., & Wood, A.T. (1995). Boundary Breaking. Dubuque, Iowa: Kendall/Hunt.
  4. Beyer, B.K. (1987). Pracatical Strategies for the Teaching of Thinking. Boston: Allyn & Bacon
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  7. Friedman, E.A. (1994). A management perspective on effective technology integration: Top ten questions for school administrators. Technological Horizons in Education Journal. 22(4), 89-90.
  8. Glaser, R. (1984). Education and thinking. American Psychologist, 39(2), 93-104.
  9. Perkins, D.N. (1985). Thinking Frames: An integrative perspective on teaching cognitive skills. Unpublished paper delivered at ASCD Conferences on Approaches to Teaching Thinking, Alexandria, VA.
  10. Quimby, N. (1985). On testing and teaching intelligence: A conversation with Robert Sternberg. Educational Leadership, 43(2), 53.
  11. Sternberg, R.J. (1984). How can we teach intelligence? Educational Leadership, 42(1), 38-50. Kay W. Allen, University of Central Florida, Orlando, FL 32816-1250 Phone: (407) 823-2037, FAX: (407) 823-5144 e-mail: kallen@pegasus.cc.ucf.edu

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