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Getting Computers into the Classroom — a South African Perspective
PROCEEDINGS

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Education during the apartheid years in South Africa was based on ethnic, tribal, and language groupings. The underlying philosophy behind this segregation was the concept of mother-tongue instruction for the initial years of education. As a result, school education in South Africa is currently controlled by 17 education departments, of which four provide for white pupils, one each for Coloured pupils (people of mixed race) and Indian pupils and the remainder for Black pupils, including the homelands and the selfgoverning states (Clark, Hosticka & de Neuilly Rice, 1993)

Citation

Assheton-Smith , M.C. (1994). Getting Computers into the Classroom — a South African Perspective. In J. Willis, B. Robin & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 1994--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4-6). Chesapeake, VA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 22, 2019 from .

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