You are here:

Preparing U.S. Faculty to Teach in an Asian MBA Program
PROCEEDINGS

, Benedictine University, United States

Global Learn, in Online, Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

There is a general air of excitement when an organization decides to do business overseas. Benedictine University experienced the same initial excitement when it signed the contract to deliver an MBA program overseas. Adjunct faculty, many of whom had international business experience, clamored to teach in the program. Too often faculty are offered no preparation other than being given a Visa and a 1-2 page introduction to the cultural customs they may encounter in their classroom. Many universities delivering programs overseas struggle to find an adequate model that covers classroom management and pedagogy to function successfully in an overseas classroom. This paper is a case study based on a U.S. university offering an MBA program in Asia, examining best practices that have evolved over six years reflecting faculty experience in the Asian classroom, and offering a model for preparing faculty to teach in Asia.

Citation

Borowicz, S. (2012). Preparing U.S. Faculty to Teach in an Asian MBA Program. In Proceedings of Global Learn 2012: Global Conference on Learning and Technology (pp. 119-125). Online,: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. 1. Debowski, S. (2005). Across the divide: teaching a transnational MBA in a second language. High education Research& Development, 24 (3), 265-280.
  2. 2. Flowerdew, L. (1998). A cultural perspective on groupwork. ELT Journal, 52, 323-329.
  3. 3. Haight, G.T., & Kwong, K.K. (2001). Future of the MBA in China. Business Forum, 24 (1,2), 33-36.
  4. 4. Johnstone, H. (1997). Lesson in supply and demand. Asian Business, 33 (6), 58-59.
  5. 5. Parks, S. & Raymond, P.M. (2004). Strategy use by nonnative-English-speaking students in an MBA program: Not business as usual! The Modern Language Journal, 88 (iii), 374-389.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

Slides