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Ecologies for Open Learning: TOOLS at the University of Windsor
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, , University of Windsor, Canada

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montréal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-98-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This paper is a work-in-progress on the development of a new office for open learning at the University of Windsor, Ontario, Canada. The Office for Open Learning Services (TOOLS) is a newly established venture to promote strategic and systemic development of open learning, elearning or online learning across the University. The interest to promote open and e-learning is underscored by the University’s goal to enable its students to engage in successful, quality and contemporary educational experiences. It is a both timely and compelling opportunity: particularly as developments around MOOCs and Open Educational Resources are heralded daily and talk of the flipped classroom becomes commonplace. The focus in this paper is the utilisation of an ecology of open learning as a coherent and integrated approach to online and open learning development: both in applying ecological principles to cross-campus open learning developments; but also in applying those principles to the development of the office itself, ie developing TOOLS as an immersive ecological model of open learning

Citation

Smith, C. & Wright, A. (2012). Ecologies for Open Learning: TOOLS at the University of Windsor. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2012--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 1 (pp. 1734-1739). Montréal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 20, 2019 from .

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