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Active Recruiting Increases Gender Diversity in High School CS Classes PROCEEDINGS

, Lake Brantley High School, United States ; , UVA and NCWIT, United States ; , University of Virginia, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-92-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

We report here on the positive impact of professional development workshops for high school computer science teachers, on the excellent results obtained by a participating teacher, and on the findings of an ad hoc natural experiment with active recruiting. The evidence supports the claim that active recruiting, using messages tailored to the interests and motivations of the audience, results in more and diverse students for high school computer science classes. As active recruiting increased, CS courses were larger and better gender balanced, in contrast to the typical pattern of fewer females as computing course level increases. This observation is good news, because computing needs more students to meet projected workforce demands.

Citation

Reichelson, S., Cohoon, J.M. & Cohoon, J. (2012). Active Recruiting Increases Gender Diversity in High School CS Classes. In P. Resta (Ed.), Proceedings of SITE 2012--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1582-1589). Austin, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 22, 2018 from .

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