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Designing and Evaluating Software Supports for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a 3D Virtual Learning Environment PROCEEDINGS

, , , , , University of Missouri, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Honolulu, Hawaii, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-90-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper is a report on the longitudinal design, development and systematic evaluation of personal pods. The personal pods are software tools to support grouping behavior in a collaborative three-dimensional virtual learning environment for individuals with autism spectrum disorders. Design-based research methods were used for the iterative design and development of personal pods. Following three design, development and usage testing iterations, a single-subject, alternating treatments design was performed to examine the impact of personal pods on participants’ avatar movement behavior. Findings indicate that the personal pods did impact participants’ avatar movement behavior, but the magnitude of this impact is unclear. Possible reasons for this lack of clarity in the research results are discussed. Potential improvements to the research design are presented, and directions for future research are provided.

Citation

Schmidt, M., Laffey, J., Galyen, K., Babiuch, R. & Wang, X. (2011). Designing and Evaluating Software Supports for Individuals with Autism Spectrum Disorders in a 3D Virtual Learning Environment. In C. Ho & M. Lin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2011--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 897-905). Honolulu, Hawaii, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 17, 2018 from .

Keywords

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