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Toward reduction of dropout rates in schools: A proposal for a social-skills-oriented approach to relieve the stress of adolescents in interpersonal communication
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, , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan ; , Tokyo Metropolitan univ., Japan ; , Center of ICT and Distance Education, Japan ; , Tokyo Institute of Technology, Japan

Global Learn, in Melbourne, Australia ISBN 978-1-880094-85-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE)

Abstract

The aim of this study is to find a cognitive approach to resolve interpersonal stress caused by social skill deficits. Japanese schools, at present, face interpersonal problems caused by social skill deficits among adolescents. The authors mainly researched on the relationship between the relative differences in the subjective appraisal of social skills and stress reaction. The result was that differences in the subjective appraisal of social skills were significantly related to subjective stress and that decoding skill in social skills was associated with stress significantly. On the basis of the experiment’s result, the author proposed the program of increasing SS’ self-efficacy and decreasing stress. The program was to feed successful experience of decoding back to subjects. As a result subjects significantly increased SS’ self-efficacy. These findings indicate that educators should pay attention to students’ social skills to tackle the dropout problem in schools.

Citation

Uenoyama, R., Ara, Y., Watanabe, Y., Kato, H. & Nishihara, A. (2011). Toward reduction of dropout rates in schools: A proposal for a social-skills-oriented approach to relieve the stress of adolescents in interpersonal communication. In S. Barton, J. Hedberg & K. Suzuki (Eds.), Proceedings of Global Learn Asia Pacific 2011--Global Conference on Learning and Technology (pp. 440-447). Melbourne, Australia: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 20, 2019 from .

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