You are here:

Online Teacher Education Course Redesign: From Stand-Alone Activities to Content Area Design Teams
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Texas State University-San Marcos, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-84-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper discusses the redesign process of an online graduate secondary education course that was originally designed with stand-alone activities to one that is project-based. The design is such that the graduate students participate in the kinds of authentic activities that teachers are expected to do on a routine basis–design units of instruction and develop daily lesson plans to effectively facilitate student learning. Students are divided into content area design teams and use wiki technology as their design studios to collaboratively create an instructional unit and corresponding lesson plans that illustrate the various models of teaching. Additionally, members of the content area design teams fulfill primary weekly roles such as visual summary virtuoso, multimedia master, discussion facilitator, and lesson plan facilitator as they collaboratively create learning artifacts within the wiki environment.

Citation

Lee, K., Bos, B. & Turnbull, K. (2011). Online Teacher Education Course Redesign: From Stand-Alone Activities to Content Area Design Teams. In M. Koehler & P. Mishra (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2011--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 443-448). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

View References & Citations Map

References

  1. Borrego, J. (2010). Roadmap for a successful transition to an online environment. Contemporary Issues in Education Research, 3(5), 59-66.
  2. Bos, B. & Lee, K. (2010). Problem-based instruction and web 2.0: Meeting the needs of the 21st century learner. In C. Maddux (Ed.), Research highlights in information technology and teacher education 2010 (pp. 71-78).
  3. Ding, A. (2009). Tensions and struggles in fostering collaborative teacher autonomy online. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 3(1), 65-81.
  4. EdTech Leaders Online. (2005). Project-based learning template. Retrieved August 2, 2010, from http://www.edtechleaders.org.
  5. Hampel, R. (2009). Training teachers for the multimedia age: Developing teacher expertise to enhance online learner interaction and collaboration. Innovation in Language Learning and Teaching, 3(1), 35-50.
  6. Hou, H., Chang, K., & Sung, Y. (2009). Using blogs as a professional development tool for teachers: Analysis of interaction behavioral patterns. Interactive Learning Environments, 17(4), 325-340.
  7. Hur, J., & Brush, T. (2009). Teacher participation in online communities: Why do teachers want to participate in self-generated online communities of K-12 teachers?. Journal of Research on Technology in Education, 41(3), 279303.
  8. Maushak, N.J., & Ou, C. (2008). Using synchronous communication to facilitate graduate students' online collaboration. Quarterly Review of Distance Education: Research That Guides Practice, 8(2), 161.
  9. Picciano, A.G., & Seaman, J. (2007). K-12 online learning: A survey of US school district administrators. Retrieved October 19, 2010, from http://sloanconsortium.org/publications/survey/K-12_06
  10. Palloff, R.M., & Pratt, K. (2009). Assessing the online learner: Resources and strategies for faculty. San Francisco, CA: Jossey-Bass.
  11. Roberts, T.R. (2004). Online collaborative learning: Theory and practice. Hershey: Information Science Publishing.
  12. Sakai. (2004). Welcome to Sakai. Retrieved October 13, 2010, from http://sakaiproject.org/
  13. Way, R. (2006). Instructional Design Using the ADDIE Model. Retrieved October 19, 2010, from http://raleighway.com/addie/.
  14. Wang, Q. (2006). Quality assurance--Best practices for assessing online programs. International Journal on ELearning, 5(2), 265-274.
  15. Wiggins, G., & McTighe, J. (2005). Understanding by design. Alexandria, VA: ASCD.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

View References & Citations Map

Cited By

  1. Developing Digital-Age Teacher Competencies: Online Collaborative Instructional Design Teams

    Beth Bos & Kathryn Lee, Texas State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2012 (Mar 05, 2012) pp. 166–172

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.