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An Examination of Learning Outcomes in Hyflex Learning Environments PROCEEDINGS

, Illinois State University, United States ; , Ohio University, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Orlando, Florida, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-83-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

New advances in technology have enabled teaching and learning in a variety of environments in higher education. One approach that continues to evolve and expand is the blended delivery option. Blended instruction has mainly involved the instructor making decisions regarding the combination of online and in-class learning activities required for the course. Recently, an innovative blended model, hyflex learning, has begun to emerge. Hyflex learning incorporates blended learning characteristics with a more flexible framework. With this model, each student and not the instructor, elects the combination of activities they believe will best meet their learning needs. To date, the literature regarding the effectiveness of this version of blended learning is very limited. This study explores the extent to which students’ needs and expectations are met in this type of environment. In addition, instructor perspectives regarding participation and performance in hyflex classes compared to previously taken face-to-face classes are also examined.

Citation

Kyei-Blankson, L. & Godwyll, F. (2010). An Examination of Learning Outcomes in Hyflex Learning Environments. In J. Sanchez & K. Zhang (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2010--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 532-535). Orlando, Florida, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 24, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Academic Students’ Satisfaction and Learning Outcomes in a HyFlex Course: Do Delivery Modes Matter?

    Sawsen Lakhal, University of Sherbrooke, Canada; Hager Khechine & Daniel Pascot, Laval University, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2014 (Oct 27, 2014) pp. 1075–1083

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