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Is There a Difference in Student Achievement Based on the Delivery Method in an Undergraduate Assessment Course: A Comparison of Face-to-Face, Hybrid, and Online Sections
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, Eastern Kentucky University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This study looked at student achievement in an undergraduate assessment course presented to three groups of students via three different course delivery methods in a teacher education program at a large comprehensive university in the South. One group of students (N = 26) was taught in a traditional face-to-face section, one group was in a hybrid section (N = 16) which received their instruction partially in a classroom and partially online, and one group was fully online (N = 31). The study used the four metrics of achievement on the midterm exam, the comprehensive final exam, the comprehensive final project, and the grade achieved in the course. Even though the course contained a large statistics component, and even though, since it was conducted in 2009, technology had increased the opportunity for students in the traditional classroom to interact with the material in more meaningful ways than in the past, the study determined that there was no statistically significant difference among the three groups on any of the measures.

Citation

Lovern, J.J. (2010). Is There a Difference in Student Achievement Based on the Delivery Method in an Undergraduate Assessment Course: A Comparison of Face-to-Face, Hybrid, and Online Sections. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 2462-2467). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 6, 2021 from .

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