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Mobile Phone Usage and Perceptions in Japanese University EFL Classrooms
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, , University of Tsukuba, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Toronto, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-81-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

This paper considers recent technological improvements to mobile phones that are making such devices an increasingly viable alternative to computers for certain tasks in education. It investigated the use and perceptions of mobile phones by 249 university students studying English as a foreign language in Japan. Results indicated that, students used mobile phones primarily for doing e-mail (4.26 hours weekly) and Internet surfing (3.96 hours weekly), whereas the devices were used less for actually conversing with someone (1.20 hours weekly). Furthermore, this group of students had varied abilities when using mobile technology, yet most participants were successful at simple tasks such as accessing information and submitting homework. Among factors that might inhibit successful implementation of the use of mobile phones for education, cost and security concerns were minimal, but student reservations about using mobile phones for educational tasks appeared to be a mediating factor.

Citation

MacLean, G. & Elwood, J. (2010). Mobile Phone Usage and Perceptions in Japanese University EFL Classrooms. In J. Herrington & C. Montgomerie (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2010--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 1774-1783). Toronto, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 19, 2020 from .

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