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Writing presence: making absence present in online pedagogy
PROCEEDINGS

, University of North Texas, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Diego, CA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-78-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

In this paper I explore how teacher education students used a computer-mediated tool in a teaching certification program. The question, ‘why are students not discussing online?’, is considered. In writing online, the author is engaged in a modality that is different from the textuality of a textbook or the orality of classroom discussion. Labeling a virtual space as a place for discussion (e.g., discussion board) does not bring discussion into effect. I suggest that online pedagogy can make absence present by considering an alternative design for online activities to engage learners. I argue that we must give due emphasis not only to the instructional and technological design of a computer-mediated tool, but also to the kinds of relations it allows and the experiences it shapes. This paper suggests two design considerations that may contribute to a more pedagogically effective textual performance of online pedagogy by employing the notion of grounding and coupling of online tasks.

Citation

Enriquez, J. (2010). Writing presence: making absence present in online pedagogy. In D. Gibson & B. Dodge (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2010--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 455-462). San Diego, CA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved April 23, 2019 from .

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References

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Cited By

  1. Switching Roles: a critique of the constructivist perspective on teachers and students – the case of online role-play simulation games

    Roni Linser, Fablusi P/L, Australia

    Global Learn 2011 (Mar 28, 2011) pp. 1515–1518

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.