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Reframing Multimodal Composing for Student Learning: Lessons on Purpose from the Buffalo DV Project
ARTICLE

, University at Buffalo (SUNY), United States

CITE Journal Volume 10, Number 2, ISSN 1528-5804 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

In a study of urban secondary teachers moving out of professional development and into their classrooms, the research team documented the learning processes of teachers and student groups during their digital video composing to make sense of the curriculum. Taken together, these ethnographic case studies provide evidence that digital video composing can be a potent literacy tool that leads to increased student engagement and learning. Important to English educators is this finding: Learning to use and to teach digital composing can induce changes in teachers’ epistemology and social practices that promote changes in their teaching and student learning. In this article, a framework for a multimodal literacy pedagogy is elaborated, generated from these analyses of teachers changing over time. Teachers who have transformed themselves and their classrooms to enact student multimodal composing on curricular concepts have these transacting principles in common: They (a) design social spaces for mediating students’ multimodal composing activities; (b) co-construct with students authentic purposes for these composing activities about curricular concepts; (c) focus explicit attention to multimodal design and critique of multimodal texts; and (d) persistently open opportunities for students to draw on their identities and “lifeworlds” (Holland, Lachicotte, Skinner, & Cain, 2001).

Citation

Miller, S. (2010). Reframing Multimodal Composing for Student Learning: Lessons on Purpose from the Buffalo DV Project. Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education, 10(2), 197-219. Waynesville, NC USA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved October 16, 2019 from .

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