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Investigating Lecturers’ use of Learning Designs to Support Technology Enhanced Course Design
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, , , University of Wollongong, Australia

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-76-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

The effective integration of technology into teaching and learning has been a focus of universities and governments for the past decade. Yet progress towards this goal has been limited to date. Knowledge of how to integrate technology has become a necessity for university lecturers and effective models of support are needed to facilitate this often challenging process. However, little is known about how the individual lecturer designs and what methods of support might best help his or her knowledge of how to integrate technology. One reason that this area has been under-researched may be the inherent challenges in investigating design processes which by its very nature is difficult to observe. This paper describes a case study methodology designed to overcome these challenges in order to study lecturers’ use of learning designs and the development of technological, pedagogical and content knowledge while designing a unit of study.

Citation

Jones, J., Bennett, S. & Lockyer, L. (2009). Investigating Lecturers’ use of Learning Designs to Support Technology Enhanced Course Design. In T. Bastiaens, J. Dron & C. Xin (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2009--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2719-2725). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

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