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Role of student feedback: Results from Integrating Learner-Centered Theory, Content & Technology to Create an Engaging Pedagogy for K-12 Students
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, , George Mason University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Charleston, SC, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-67-9 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

A qualitative study reported on “In what ways does gathering student feedback enhance teachers’ understandings of teaching with technology?” Participants were 62 K-12 teachers enrolled in a masters’ degree program. Data sources included: teacher-created projects and presentation materials (evidence of the ways teachers infused technology, content, and learner-centered theory into practice); individual reflective narratives; and transcripts of WebCT interviews. Data sources were coded and analyzed using the constant comparison method (Bogdan & Biklen, 1982). Student feedback was collected via class discussions, individual conversations, and paper or electronic surveys. Three dominant themes emerged from the data. Student feedback: 1) encouraged teachers to make pedagogical adjustments, 2) provided teachers with insights on student attitudes toward technology, and 3) influenced teacher attitudes and motivation to become a more competent user of technology.

Citation

Kayler, M. & Sullivan, L. (2009). Role of student feedback: Results from Integrating Learner-Centered Theory, Content & Technology to Create an Engaging Pedagogy for K-12 Students. In I. Gibson, R. Weber, K. McFerrin, R. Carlsen & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2009--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 3653-3658). Charleston, SC, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 22, 2019 from .

Keywords

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