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The Effects of the Use of Interactive Whiteboards on Student Achievement
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, Kent State University, United States ; , , Research Center for Educational Technology, Kent State University, United States

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Vienna, Austria ISBN 978-1-880094-65-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The purpose of the research reported in this paper was to investigate whether the use of interactive whiteboards in English language arts and/or mathematics lessons improved student learning in those areas as measured by student scores on state achievement tests. The study examined the reading and mathematics achievement test scores of all students in the third through eighth grades in a small urban school district in northern Ohio and compared scores between students whose teachers used interactive whiteboards for instruction and those whose teachers did not. Results show slightly higher performance among students in the interactive whiteboard group, with students in the fourth and fifth grades exhibiting the greatest advantage for interactive whiteboard instruction. Further research on the use of interactive whiteboards for K-12 teaching and learning is thus clearly indicated.

Citation

Swan, K., Schenker, J. & Kratcoski, A. (2008). The Effects of the Use of Interactive Whiteboards on Student Achievement. In J. Luca & E. Weippl (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2008--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 3290-3297). Vienna, Austria: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 14, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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