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Online Graduate Studies in Art Education: Promising Strategies for Stimulating Higher Order Thinking in Asynchronous Discussion Forums
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, Texas Woman's University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The presenter will provide examples of promising social constructivist strategies for stimulating higher order thinking in online graduate courses in art education. These strategies are: 1. asynchronous large & small group online discussion forums facilitated by students who assume creative roles, 2. student created, large group PowerPoint presentations that are facilitated by students using Socratic questioning and 3. contemplative practices such as mindfulness, reflective practice, journaling, meditation and art making. Preliminary results of a qualitative study indicate that when a combination of offline and online strategies are used within an online constructivist learning environment, students engage in higher order thinking more frequently than when online asynchronous discussion strategies are used alone. The strategies used within this comprehensive online instructional design will be of interest to scholars who are studying technological pedagogical content knowledge.

Citation

Gregory, D. (2007). Online Graduate Studies in Art Education: Promising Strategies for Stimulating Higher Order Thinking in Asynchronous Discussion Forums. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (p. 2198). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 19, 2019 from .

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