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Myth Busting: Do Students Really Cheat More on Internet Assessments?
PROCEEDINGS

, , , Marshall University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in San Antonio, Texas, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-61-7 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstract: Cheating has become a hot button issue on college campuses. With the help of the Internet and related technologies students today have many more ways to be academically dishonest than students a generation ago. With more and more web-based course offerings, the concern is whether student cheating will increase as students work and take tests away from the prying eyes of instructors. While the research on academic dishonesty in general is quite extensive, there is very little research on student cheating on Internet assessments. This pilot study examines whether web-based assessments (online tests, quizzes, and electronically submitted papers) encourage more student cheating than similar in-class assessments. This study of approximately 120 pre-service teachers used both direct response and randomized response questions to get a clearer picture of student cheating.

Citation

Watson, G., Sottile, J. & Backus, M. (2007). Myth Busting: Do Students Really Cheat More on Internet Assessments?. In R. Carlsen, K. McFerrin, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2007--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 554-557). San Antonio, Texas, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved July 18, 2019 from .

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