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Conditional Tags and Text: Personalizing the Online Environment While Remaining Scalable PROCEEDINGS

, Deltakedu, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Vancouver, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-57-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

E-learning presents both a multitude of opportunities and challenges for learners, for instructors, and for designers alike. Perhaps one of the most unique challenges has been the notion of personalization. Educators have rightfully asked how instruction within the mediated environment can adaptively and creatively reach the learner in a personal way. Can our content and approach truly resonate with multiple learners? Just as importantly, can we address difference and remain scalable? Within this paper, conditional tags are examined as a scalable means for personalizing the e-learning environment. Specific explorations include using conditional tags to address different learner populations, to personalize the learning environment, and to unidimensionally construct the multidimensional curriculum.

Citation

Chrouser, K. (2005). Conditional Tags and Text: Personalizing the Online Environment While Remaining Scalable. In G. Richards (Ed.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2005--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 47-49). Vancouver, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 19, 2018 from .

Keywords

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