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The Effects of a Long-tone Exercise Support System on Wind Instrument Players’ Pitch and Tone Shape
PROCEEDING

, School of Economics, Hokusei Gakuen University, Japan ; , Chiba Institute of Technology, Japan ; , National Institute of Technology, Hakodate College, Japan ; , Shinshu University, Japan ; , Meikai University, Japan ; , Shinshu University, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Amsterdam, Netherlands ISBN 978-1-939797-42-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The number of accomplished instructors in Japan does not meet the needs of the many school bands in the country. It is necessary for players in these bands to evaluate their own performances when they practice without such instructors. However, it is rare that beginners are aware of pitch tone and shape. The authors of this study have developed a system called “Pik-kun” that aims to support beginners’ long-tone exercises without the aid of accomplished instructors. This article provides an outline of the Pik-kun application and its accompanying leaflet, as well as the results of an experiment that was conducted for two months among clarinet players in a junior high school band. The results of the experiment were positive; participants felt that the sounds they produced and their awareness of those sounds were improved as a result of using Pik-kun.

Citation

Kaneko, D., Kunimune, H., Kurayama, M., Morishita, T., Yamamoto, T. & Oguchi, H. (2019). The Effects of a Long-tone Exercise Support System on Wind Instrument Players’ Pitch and Tone Shape. In J. Theo Bastiaens (Ed.), Proceedings of EdMedia + Innovate Learning (pp. 1182-1187). Amsterdam, Netherlands: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved January 25, 2020 from .