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Exploring Lived Experiences in Distance Learning: A Phenomenological Lens
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, University of Minnesota, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Phenomenological research in the field of learning design and technologies, and distance learning in particular, is growing and maturing with greater varieties. This research study seeks to contribute to and advance the knowledge base by using a post-intentional phenomenological lens to explore lived experiences in distance learning in varied contexts, both formally and informally. Data was gathered through six waves of data moments (i.e., written lived experience descriptions) from ten graduate students in an online course. A whole-parts-whole approach is used to analyze and interpret the data in order to better understand what it is like to experience being a distance learner.

Citation

Kennedy, J. (2018). Exploring Lived Experiences in Distance Learning: A Phenomenological Lens. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 762-766). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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