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Relationships between Demographic and Academic Student Characteristics and Success for Students in Online Courses
PROCEEDING

, Moraine Valley Community College, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Based on growing online enrollment and significantly lower success rates, a study of community college student data was conducted to identify relationships between demographic and academic student characteristics and online student success. Online student success was operationalized as students who earned a GPA of 2.0 or higher in online courses. Cross-tabulations and Chi-Square analyses were used to determine if a significant relationship existed between online GPA and each demographic and academic characteristic for students who took at least one online course during the academic year as well as for a subset of students who took only online courses; results revealed some significant relationships and differences between groups. All demographic student characteristics including age, ethnicity, and gender were significantly related to online GPA for online students overall while only age and ethnicity were significant for online only students. There were also significant relationships between online GPA and all but one academic characteristic for each online student group. Cumulative GPA had the strongest relationship to online GPA for both online student groups followed by total credit hours. This study identified some student characteristics significantly related to online student success which is important because while overall enrollment at this college has declined online student enrollment has continued to increase and online student success rates need improvement.

Citation

Davidson, J. (2018). Relationships between Demographic and Academic Student Characteristics and Success for Students in Online Courses. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1014-1023). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

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