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How English Learners Say Blended Learning Improves Their Language Skills
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, , Brigham Young University-Hawaii, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Forty-two students enrolled in blended learning courses in a Western university in the United States who self-identified as not speaking English as their first language were asked to comment on how the blended learning format helped strengthen their writing and English language skills. The findings from their responses are distilled in the following 3 main themes: a) Blended learning increases my confidence in communicating in English, b) Blended learning requires personal accountability for one’s own learning, and c) The discussion board improves grammar and writing skills. The authors share selected student responses on these 3 themes, as well as describe how they format their own blended learning courses.

Citation

Springer, S. & Springer, A. (2018). How English Learners Say Blended Learning Improves Their Language Skills. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 985-988). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 21, 2019 from .

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References

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