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Teaching Computational Thinking to In-Service Computer Science Teachers through a Massive Open Online Course
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, Ankara University, Turkey ; , Baskent University, Turkey ; , Yildiz Teknik University, Turkey

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Having gained popularity in recent years, the computational thinking concept has become an important subject of computer science education for students of all ages. Moreover, with the revision of computing course curricula for K-12 in most countries, not only students but also pre-service and in-service teachers’ feel the need to explore this concept in greater detail. Based on these facts, this study aims to apply the MOOC strategy to teach computational thinking to in-service teachers, and then to reveal the in-service teachers’ thoughts about the course. The findings revealed that the majority of the in-service teachers are not ready to teach computational thinking at the K-12 level in Turkey.

Citation

Gulbahar, Y., Kalelioglu, F. & Kert, S.B. (2018). Teaching Computational Thinking to In-Service Computer Science Teachers through a Massive Open Online Course. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 922-928). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

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