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Preparing Faculty for Successful Instruction in Today’s Classroom
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, , , The University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, United States ; , University of Tennessee at Chattanooga, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-35-3 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Frequently the success of a student is directly related to the practices of the instructor. In-depth knowledge of a subject does not automatically lead to effective learning. Faculty who present challenging learning environments are often cited as the best teachers because they require students to develop new skills and approach learning from unique perspectives. Although these outcomes are desirable, offering a learning environment of this type is not intuitive for all instructors. A task force representing engaged faculty from all colleges of the institution gathered to discuss ways to improve teaching through a new faculty pedagogy experience. This group proposed methods of preparing new faculty for successful instructional practices. Through the semester-long class, some intended, and some surprising, outcomes emerged. The development process and the feedback from the first two courses revealed the value of this experience as well as opportunities for continued enhancement for the future.

Citation

Rutledge, V., Crawford, E., Ford, D. & Rausch, D. (2018). Preparing Faculty for Successful Instruction in Today’s Classroom. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 317-322). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 15, 2019 from .

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