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Social Media & Teacher Professional Development
PROCEEDING

, University of Idaho, United States ; , Oklahoma State University, United States ; , Old Dominion University, United States ; , University of North Texas, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States ; , Indiana University-Purdue University, United States ; , Wayne State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Washington, D.C., United States ISBN 978-1-939797-32-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The idea of social media’s existing application and future potential for professional development drives a growing subset of academic research As we encourage preservice and inservice teachers to engage in these platforms to hone or refine their classroom practice, a number of questions emerge How do we assess participation in these spaces? What uses in particular should we recommend? Further, the very notion of conducting research in these spaces also poses interesting questions From methodologies to frameworks, commonly accepted practices help shape the future of the field Lastly, the issue of privacy and policy poses perhaps the most significant area for attention The intent of this panel discussion is generate conversation on how future research and application on social media usage and research might evolve over time

Citation

Dousay, T.A., Asino, T., Luo, T., Krutka, D.G., Greenhalgh, S., Rodesiler, L. & Walster, D. (2018). Social Media & Teacher Professional Development. In E. Langran & J. Borup (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2251-2255). Washington, D.C., United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 17, 2018 from .

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References

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Slides