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Education and Information Technology Annual 2018: A Selection of AACE Award Papers EBook

, Open University, The Netherlands & Fernuniversität, Germany ; , AACE, United States

Education and Information Technology Annual 2018: A Selection of AACE Award Papers. Published . Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE).

Abstract

We are proud to present to you this selection of 20 award-winning papers from AACE’s conferences.
This year's selection includes papers from the annual conference of the Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education (SITE) in Austin, Texas, the World Conference on Educational Media & Technology (EdMedia) in Washington D.C., the World Conference on E-Learning (E-Learn) in Vancouver, Canada. The decision to nominate a conference paper for an award was made by peer reviewers. All authors were honored during the conference and received a certificate for outstanding research and contribution to the conference. The award papers are grouped in seven parts, providing a timely overview and record of topics that are of primary interest in educational technology this year.
We hope that the reader enjoys this selection as much as we enjoyed working with these cutting-edge scholars. It is the seventh year that we publish this edition.

Citation

Bastiaens, T.J. & Marks, G. (2018). Education and Information Technology Annual 2018: A Selection of AACE Award Papers. Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved September 23, 2018 from .

Keywords

PART 1 PERSPECTIVES ON EDUCATIONAL PRACTICE

  1. Chapter 1 Open Educational Practice and Preservice Teacher Education: 17
    Understanding past practice and future possibilities Peter R Albion and David Jones, University of Southern Queensland, Australia Chris Campbell, Griffith University, Australia Janice Jones, University of Southern Queensland, Australia
  2. Chapter 2 Reasons why some university students avoid the online learning 29
    environment in blended courses. Robert Ellis, Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation, University of Sydney, Australia Feifei Han, Centre for Research on Learning and Innovation, University of Sydney, Australia

PART 2 COMMUNICATION

  1. Chapter 3 The Challenges and Benefits of Regular Face-to-Face 43
    Interactions at Large-Scale Blended Learning Courses David Sichau and Lukas FКssler, Department of Computer Science, ETH Zurich, Switzerland
  2. Chapter 4 Cooperative Learning and Web 2.0: a Social Perspective on Critical 55
    Thinking Rae Carrington Schipke, English Department, Central Connecticut State University, United States
  3. Chapter 5 A Tweet by Any Other Frame: Three Approaches to Studying Educator Interactions on Twitter 67
    K. Bret Staudt Willet, Matthew J. Koehler, and Spencer P. Greenhalgh, Michigan State University, United States
  4. Chapter 6 Using Virtual Roleplay Modules to Develop Teacher Candidates’ 75
    Competence in Communicating About Bullying Deborah Schussler, Jennifer Frank, Michelle Wright, TK Lee, and Julia Mahfouz Pennsylvania State University, United States

PART 3 INSTRUCTIONAL DESIGN

  1. Chapter 7 Distance Learning Instructional Design: Assessing Professional Competence with Miller’s Pyramid 83
    Barbara Schultz-Jones, PhD, Daniella Smith, PhD, Michelle Farabough, Doctoral Student, and RaeAnna Jeffers, Graduate Student, University of North Texas, United States
  2. Chapter 8 Activity Theory and Interactive Design for the African Storybook Initiative 95
    Alan Amory, Saide, South Africa
  3. Chapter 9 Teacher Perspectives on Technology Integration Professional Development: Formal, Informal, and Independent Learning Activities 107
    Monty Jones, School of Education, Virginia Commonwealth University, United States Sara Dexter, Curry School of Education, University of Virginia, United States
  4. Chapter 10 Computational Thinking in Computer Science Classrooms: 121
    Viewpoints from CS Educators Jon Good and Aman Yadav, Michigan State University, United States Punya Mishra, Arizona State University, United States

PART 4 TPACK

  1. Chapter 11 Differences in preservice teachers’ readiness to use ICT in education and development of TPACK 133
    Erkko Sointu and Teemu Valtonen, University of Eastern Finland Christine Cutucache, University of Nebraska at Omaha Jari Kukkonen, University of Eastern Finland Matthew C. Lambert, University of Nebraska-Lincoln Kati MКkitalo-Siegl, University of Eastern Finland
  2. Chapter 12 Exploring Independence of Five TPACK Domains TK, PK, CK Math, CK Science, and TPACK of Pre-service Special Education Teachers. 143
    Aleksandra Kaplon-Schilis, CUNY, The Graduate Center, United States Irina Lyublinskaya, CUNY, College of Staten Island, United States

PART 5 MAKERS

  1. Chapter 13 Physical Computing for STEAM Education: Maker-Educators’ Experiences in an Online Graduate Course 155
    Yu-Chang Hsu, Yu-Hui Ching, Sally Baldwin, Boise State University, United States
  2. Chapter 14 Educational Effects of a Virtual Reality Simulation System for constructing Self-Built PCs 165
    Shogo Teranishi, Graduate School of Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Japan Yoshio Yamagishi, Department of Media Informatics, Kanazawa Institute of Technology, Japan

PART 6 MOBILE LEARNING

  1. Chapter 15 Spaced Repetition in Mobile Learning Games-A Cure to Bulimic Learning? 177
    Florian Schimanke and Robert Mertens, Dept. of Computer Science, HSW University of Applied Sciences, Hameln, Germany Ute Schmid, Dept. of Computer Science, University of Bamberg, Bamberg, Germany
  2. Chapter 16 Students with Disabilities: Mobile Device Ownership, Usage, and Perspectives on Mobile Learning 189
    Linda Chmiliar and, Carrie Anton, Athabasca University
  3. Chapter 17 Validation of Mobile Phone Use in the Classroom Survey 201
    Blanche O'Bannon, Karee Dunn, and Yujeong Park, University of Tennessee, United States
  4. Chapter 18 Using Mobile Technology to Support Physician and Student Learning as Part of Patient Care 211
    Janette R. Hill, College of Education, University of Georgia, United States Michelle A. Nuss, AU/UGA Medical Partnership, United States Ronald M. Cervero, Uniformed Services University, United States Julie K. Gaines, AU/UGA Medical Partnership, United States Bruce Middendorf, St Mary’s Hospital, United States Supriya D. Mishra, College of Education, University of Georgia, United States

PART 7 EVALUATION & ASSESSMENT

  1. Chapter 19 Factors Influencing Response Rates in Online Student Evaluation Systems: A Systematic Review Approach 225
    Samuel Asare and Ben Kei Daniel, University of Otago, Higher Education Development Centre, New Zealand
  2. Chapter 20 Searching for effective peer assessment models for improving online learning in HE-Do-It-Yourself (DIY) case 233
    Irja Leppisaari, Centria University of Applied Sciences, Finland Janne Peltoniemi, Centria University of Applied Sciences, Finland Tuula Hohenthal, Centria University of Applied Sciences, Finland Yeonwook Im, Hanyang Cyber University, South Korea