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Comparison of Abstraction in Computer Coding and in Critical Thinking
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, Walden University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Abstraction is a term that is difficult to navigate as an educator because there are multiple definitions. Computer scientists have been working towards a common definition of abstraction for some time; however, the instruction and assessment of abstraction remains categorically under researched. Because abstraction is often cited as a component of computational thinking, abstraction has been summarily likened to a higher order thinking skill. Educators have studied critical thinking more than computational thinking, and there are some overlapping characteristics. The work of Armoni; Brennan & Resnick; Perrent, Kasselrood & Groot; Fuller, et al; Bloom; and Marzano & Kendall are synthesized in this comparative essay. Interestingly, as Fuller et al indicate, just as students have multiple pathways for learning computer science, students likely also have multiple pathways for learning abstraction and critical thinking.

Citation

Liebe, C. (2017). Comparison of Abstraction in Computer Coding and in Critical Thinking. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1394-1402). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 18, 2019 from .

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References

  1. Armoni, M. (2013). On teaching abstraction in Computer Science to novices. Journal of Computers in Mathematics and Science Teaching. (32) 265-284.
  2. College Board. (2015). AP Computer science principles. Retrieved from https://securemedia.collegeboard.org/digitalServices/pdf/ap/ap-computer-science-principles-curriculum-framework.pdf
  3. Dale, N.B., & Lewis, J. (2007). Computer science illuminated. Jones& Bartlett Learning.
  4. Wing, J.M. (2006). Computational thinking. Communications of the ACM, 49(3), 33-35.

These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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