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A Tale of Two Twitters: Synchronous and Asynchronous Use of the Same Hashtag
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, Michigan State University, United States ; , Georgia Southern University, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States ; , Michigan State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Austin, TX, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-27-8 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Communication in online settings can occur at the same time (synchronously) or at different times (asynchronously). A new form of online learning in which teachers communicate both at the same time and at different times is through social media platforms such as Twitter. In this descriptive, exploratory study, we set out to explore differences between synchronous and asynchronous interactions through a State Educational Twitter Hashtag (SETH) for educators in Michigan in the United States of America. We collected more than 8,000 tweets and coded for whether the tweet was during either part of a once-per-week synchronous “chat” or all other times of the week. We compared #miched between the two modes and then determined differences in terms of interactions and sentiment. Our analysis is discussed in light of findings from research on synchronous and asynchronous learning.

Citation

Rosenberg, J., Akcaoglu, M., Staudt Willet, K.B., Greenhalgh, S. & Koehler, M. (2017). A Tale of Two Twitters: Synchronous and Asynchronous Use of the Same Hashtag. In P. Resta & S. Smith (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 283-286). Austin, TX, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 11, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. What Factors Matter for Engaging Others in an Educational Conversation on Twitter?

    Matthew Koehler & Joshua Rosenberg, Michigan State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2285–2291

  2. Exploring the Education Twitter Hashtag Landscape

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Tania Tani, Participate, United States; Scott Morrison, Elon University, United States; Julie Keane, Participate, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2230–2235

  3. Advice Seeking and Giving in the Reddit r/Teachers Online Space

    Jeffrey Carpenter, Elon University, United States; Connor McDade, Alamance Burlington School System, United States; Samantha Childers, Elon University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2018 (Mar 26, 2018) pp. 2207–2215

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