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Twitter vs. Facebook: Using Social Media to Promote Collaborative Argumentation in an Online Classroom
PROCEEDING

, , University of Nevada, Las Vegas, United States

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Washington, DC, United States Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

This study aimed to: 1) evaluate Twitter as a viable tool for promoting collaborative argumentation; 2) determine if scripting through sentence openers promotes a greater number of arguments within an online discussion; and 3) compare Twitter to Facebook as viable tools for promoting collaborative argumentation. Participants were 27 undergraduate students enrolled in an online introductory Educational Psychology course. A quasi-experimental, sequential explanatory mixed methods research design was employed. Data analysis focused on the difference in the number of argument components generated by participants between the two social media platforms, Twitter and Facebook. In addition, the impact of participants’ use of sentence openers on the amount of argument components was also examined. Facebook was found to be a more viable tool for promoting online collaborative argumentation, and specific affordances of Facebook were identified.

Citation

Owens, M. & Nussbaum, E.M. (2016). Twitter vs. Facebook: Using Social Media to Promote Collaborative Argumentation in an Online Classroom. In Proceedings of E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning (pp. 1221-1234). Washington, DC, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 20, 2019 from .

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