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Using Simulation Based Learning to Enhance Preservice Teachers’ Understanding of the Educational Needs of Diverse Learners
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, , , Missouri Baptist University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This sequential mixed-method study focused on the use of the Simulation Based Learning (SBL) tool, simSchool, as a supplement to coursework and field experiences, to explore the impact on preservice teachers’ understanding of the educational needs of diverse learners. Twenty-one simulated classroom modules were created representing six different classroom settings designed to focus on four diversity areas: socioeconomic issues, ethnicities, exceptionalities, and English as second language (ESL) students. The results from the quantitative surveys indicated statistical differences in the demographic areas of: age greater than 21, junior class status, and prior multicultural experience, from the pre-to post-survey results. The analysis of the qualitative data, as well as the data embedded within the simSchool software, suggested that the use of simSchool did increase preservice teachers’ understanding of the educational needs of diverse learners.

Citation

Collum, D., Bishop, M. & Delicath, T. (2016). Using Simulation Based Learning to Enhance Preservice Teachers’ Understanding of the Educational Needs of Diverse Learners. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 547-553). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 18, 2019 from .

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