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Saudi ELLs’ Digital Gameplay Habits and Effects on SLA: A Case Study
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, , University of South Alabama, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

We conducted a single instrumental case study to understand the digital gaming usage of the dominant culture of English language learners (ELLs) at a university English language program. The purpose was to obtain qualitative and quantitative data on the bounded system of Saudi students in regards to their gaming habits, personal attitudes and cultural views toward gaming, and attitude toward gaming for language learning. The study focused on the intermediate, advanced, and transition level Saudi ELLs’ usage of digital gaming during and after school in the U.S. and Saudi Arabia. Based on the study, Saudi ELLs thoroughly enjoy commercial digital gaming and believe that they benefit educationally from the activity. They reported learning history, culture, English vocabulary, literature, math, military science, and math in descending order of importance. Students reported significant learning of English listening, speaking, and reading skills from gaming.

Citation

Rogers, S. & Johnson, B. (2016). Saudi ELLs’ Digital Gameplay Habits and Effects on SLA: A Case Study. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 599-604). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 17, 2022 from .

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Cited By

View References & Citations Map
  • Exploring the Rules of the Game: Games in the Classroom, Game-Based Learning, Gamification, and Simulations

    Jana Willis, University of Houston-Clear Lake, United States; Spencer Greenhalgh, Michigan State University, United States; Larysa Nadolny, Iowa State University, United States; Sa Liu, University of Texas, United States; Tugce Aldemir, Penn State World Campus, United States; Sandra Rogers, University of South Alabama, United States; Monica Trevathan, Tietronix Software, United States; Susan Hopper, Pedagogical Balance of Effective Learning, United States; Wendy Oliver, Thrivist, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2017 (Mar 05, 2017) pp. 475–480

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