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Easing Teachers and Students into the 3D Printer Maker Movement
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, , University of North Florida, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Savannah, GA, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

Based on practical experiences, the authors observed that 3D designers follow the Power Rules concerning how many are makers versus how many are users. This paper presents an approach we have used with K12 students, inservice teachers, undergraduate and graduate students in introducing 3D printing through a prosumer development process, by first focusing on using and adapting existing designs, then moving to original design creation. The paper also describes a 3D printing experimental class developed for graduate students to learn about 3D printing using an asynchronous distance learning approach.

Citation

Eastham, N. & Cavanaugh, T. (2016). Easing Teachers and Students into the 3D Printer Maker Movement. In G. Chamblee & L. Langub (Eds.), Proceedings of Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 136-142). Savannah, GA, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved December 9, 2018 from .

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