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Learning in the Labyrinth: Hypertext and the Changing Roles of Instructor and Learner in Higher Education PROCEEDINGS

, University of Bristol, United Kingdom ; , University of Edinburgh, United Kingdom

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-40-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The media through which academic discourses are conducted are rapidly shifting from the printed text and face to face dialogue, to the new electronic forms enabled by web-based hypertext, hypermedia and computer mediated conferencing. These new forms can be seen to embody and make explicit many of the key principles emerging from recent critical theory. Such theory, by radically challenging traditional notions of textual stability and the nature of language, also draw into question the possibility of stable meaning and systems of knowledge, the pursuit of which lie at the basis of traditional, positivist academic thought. This paper draws on such theory to consider not only how, by 'de-stabilising' the academic text, the new educational media are enabling new forms of academic discourse to emerge, but also how such changes in discourse have the potential fundamentally to alter the roles of instructor and learner, and the nature of the academic institution itself.

Citation

Bayne, S. & Land, R. (2000). Learning in the Labyrinth: Hypertext and the Changing Roles of Instructor and Learner in Higher Education. In J. Bourdeau & R. Heller (Eds.), Proceedings of ED-MEDIA 2000--World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia & Telecommunications (pp. 100-105). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved October 17, 2018 from .

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