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Getting Effective Feedback In a Video Editing Class through YouTube and Facebook: A Case Study PROCEEDINGS

, School of Economics, Hokusei Gakuen University, Japan

EdMedia + Innovate Learning, in Montreal, Quebec, Canada ISBN 978-1-939797-16-2 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC

Abstract

The author conducts a video editing class to develop university students’ media literacy. Feedback from others facilitates students’ development of video works. The author uploaded students’ works to YouTube; this did not generate effective comment feedback. In this case study, the author aimed to foster peer review outside the class. In 2013, the author encouraged students to communicate daily with students at other universities using Facebook; however, daily communication was not proactive, and peer review of students’ work was infrequent. In 2014, the author therefore changed the class design to encourage students to collaborate with an experienced graduate rather than with students at other universities. In interviews, students positively evaluated collaboration with the graduate, and indicated collaboration’s facilitation of creating video works in the classroom.

Citation

Kaneko, D. (2015). Getting Effective Feedback In a Video Editing Class through YouTube and Facebook: A Case Study. In S. Carliner, C. Fulford & N. Ostashewski (Eds.), Proceedings of EdMedia 2015--World Conference on Educational Media and Technology (pp. 1247-1250). Montreal, Quebec, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 16, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

  1. Kaneko, D. (2012). The case for developing media literacy in higher education —A proposed design for a video editing class using YouTube. Proceedings of World Conference on Educational Multimedia, Hypermedia and Telecommunications 2012, AACE, Chesapeake, VA. 388–391.
  2. Kaneko, D. (2013). The case study of utilizing peer review from outside the class at a video editing class in higher education. Conference Program& Abstracts of Papers of the World Association of Lesson Studies 2013, 198–199.

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