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Investigating a Flipped Professional Learning Approach for Helping High School Teachers Effectively Integrate Technology PROCEEDINGS

, Kennesaw State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Las Vegas, NV, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-13-1 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The literature on the Flipped Learning model acknowledges the positive impact on student learning in K-12 and higher education, as well as individuals in business environments (Yarbro, Arfstrom, McKnight & McKnight, 2014). This study provides a descriptive case, which applied the Flipped Learning model during a K-12 professional learning program at one high school in the Southeastern United States. Needs assessment data suggested that a flipped professional learning approach would benefit teachers in their efforts to use and integrate technology, as the design facilitated flexibility in pacing, individualized practice, and support from specialists in a small group environment. The discussion of the case also includes a reflection on the program’s impact.

Citation

Fuller, J. (2015). Investigating a Flipped Professional Learning Approach for Helping High School Teachers Effectively Integrate Technology. In D. Rutledge & D. Slykhuis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2015--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 920-924). Las Vegas, NV, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 18, 2018 from .

Keywords

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References

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