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Technology And Teacher Education For A Knowledge Era: Mentoring For Student Futures, Not Our Past
Article

, , University of Calgary, Canada

Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Volume 12, Number 1, ISSN 1059-7069 Publisher: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education, Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Three initiatives are described that focus on cultivating inquiry based learning with technology for student teachers. The article describes an approach by a Faculty of Education to the design, development, implementation, and evaluation of media rich learning experiences and research projects. Descriptions are provided of the type of work that student teachers complete. Emphasis is on using technology as a medium for thinking, creation, and invention rather than productivity. The main goal is to foster closer connections between campus and field experiences by cultivating collaborative relationships between university faculty, classroom teachers, and student teachers.

Citation

Jacobsen, D.M. & Lock, J.V. (2004). Technology And Teacher Education For A Knowledge Era: Mentoring For Student Futures, Not Our Past. Journal of Technology and Teacher Education, 12(1), 75-100. Norfolk, VA: Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education. Retrieved February 18, 2019 from .

Keywords

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References

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These references have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake in the references above, please contact info@learntechlib.org.

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Cited By

  1. Developing a New Technology Infusion Program for Preparing Saudi Preservice Teachers

    Mohammed Alhawiti, Indiana State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2011 (Mar 07, 2011) pp. 2330–2335

  2. Continuing Change in a Virtual World: Training and Recruiting Instructors

    Michael Barbour, Wayne State University, United States; Jim Kinsella & Matthew Wicks, Illinois Virtual High School, United States; Sacip Toker, Wayne State University, United States

    Journal of Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 17, No. 4 (October 2009) pp. 437–457

  3. Inquiry, Immigration and Integration: ICT in Pre-service Teacher Education

    Jennifer Lock, University of Calgary, Canada

    Contemporary Issues in Technology and Teacher Education Vol. 7, No. 1 (March 2007) pp. 575–589

  4. Revisiting the Required Technology Course: Making Learning Contextual and Meaningful!

    Denise Schmidt, Cynthia Garrety & Sonia Gakhar, Iowa State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2007 (Mar 26, 2007) pp. 2263–2266

  5. Mentoring Experiences: A case of one faculty member and one graduate student in a College of Education

    Lara Hagenson, Iowa State University, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2005 (2005) pp. 3205–3210

These links are based on references which have been extracted automatically and may have some errors. If you see a mistake, please contact info@learntechlib.org.