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Universal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice
PROCEEDINGS

, , Indiana State University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Atlanta, GA, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-52-5 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Waynesville, NC USA

Abstract

Two challenges facing today's classroom teachers are increased learner diversity and higher educational standards. Our current model of education, implemented during the Industrial Age, may not be adequately meeting these challenges. Despite advancements in technology and the availability of assistive devices, computer-aided instruction is often regarded as an adjunctive process. Due to its inherent flexibility, however, digital media allow the creation of customized lessons that enable diverse learners to have equal access to the general curriculum. Universal Design for Learning (UDL), an approach born of the Information Age, proposes that the general education curriculum be designed in as many formats as possible in anticipation of the unique needs of every student. Although this can be accomplished in a variety of ways, the UDL model exploits the countless options made possible by digital media for students to access information, demonstrate their understanding of concepts, and become actively engaged in the learning process.

Citation

Leinenbach, M.T. & Corey, M.L. (2004). Universal Design for Learning: Theory and Practice. In R. Ferdig, C. Crawford, R. Carlsen, N. Davis, J. Price, R. Weber & D. Willis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2004--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 4919-4926). Atlanta, GA, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved June 5, 2020 from .

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