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Quest-Based Learning: A New Approach to Preservice Teacher Technology Instruction PROCEEDINGS

, The University of Toledo, United States ; , Barton College, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

This paper briefly explains gamification and quest-based learning, a form of gamification being used for learning. The authors present their exploratory research on the effort to gamify an introductory educational technology college-level course for preservice teachers. Findings indicated that quest-based learning was very useful for helping students take responsibility for their own learning, for differentiating the pace of learning, and for cognitively challenging students. However, more scaffolding strategies are needed to assist some students with time management and independent learning. Also, social networking features, if included, could have provided more opportunities for collaboration, engagement, and in-game identity.

Citation

Lambert, J. & Ennis, J. (2014). Quest-Based Learning: A New Approach to Preservice Teacher Technology Instruction. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 2895-2900). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved November 20, 2018 from .

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Cited By

  1. Integrating Structural Gamification into Pre-Service Teacher Education

    Lorraine Beaudin, University of Lethbridge, Canada

    E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education 2016 (Nov 14, 2016) pp. 1132–1136

  2. Autonomous, Self-Paced Quest-Based Learning: Is it More Motivating than Traditional Course Instruction?

    Judy Lambert, University of Toledo, United States; Yi Gong, Keene State College, United States; Reatha Harrison, University of Toledo, United States

    Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference 2016 (Mar 21, 2016) pp. 2144–2149

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