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Tools, Tasks, and Strategies: Multimedia Education in a Mobile World
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, University of Texas at El Paso, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Jacksonville, Florida, United States ISBN 978-1-939797-07-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The Tools, Tasks, and Strategies (TTS) Framework for integrating technology in classrooms provides educators with procedures for considering and evaluating the various components of a technology-enhanced lesson in isolation, and when integrated for an instructional purpose. This is useful in the fast-changing world of multimedia learning where tools are changing quickly, and educators are constantly challenged with upgrading their skills to use media tools effectively. In this paper we describe how a university multimedia education course was re-invented using TTS in order to provide it fully online in a form accessible on a variety of platforms, including many mobile devices

Citation

Giza, B. (2014). Tools, Tasks, and Strategies: Multimedia Education in a Mobile World. In M. Searson & M. Ochoa (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2014--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 1490-1495). Jacksonville, Florida, United States: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved February 16, 2019 from .

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