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Interest maintained and anxiety comparison of static versus animated agents in gameplay
PROCEEDINGS

, Department of Industrial Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan ; , Department of Educational Psychology and Counseling, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan ; , Department of Adult and Continuing Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan ; , Department of Industrial Education, National Taiwan Normal University, Taiwan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Las Vegas, NV, USA ISBN 978-1-939797-05-6 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

In order to compare a static agent to an animated agent, this study designed two types of Chinese idiom games called String-Up for the static agent and Fishing for the animated agent. All participants in this study were 5th and 6th grade elementary school students. The result shows that the static agent fostered better achievement. In addition, interest in the static agent can be better maintained than that for the animated agent. No difference in gameplay anxiety was detected between the two types of visual agents. The gameplay anxiety of both games decreased slightly with each subsequent playing but did not reach statistical significance. The results suggested that educational game design should consider the use static rather than animated agents when considering helping students achieve better performance.

Citation

Hong, J.C., Lin, M.P., Hwang, M.Y. & Tai, K.H. (2013). Interest maintained and anxiety comparison of static versus animated agents in gameplay. In T. Bastiaens & G. Marks (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2013--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 1923-1928). Las Vegas, NV, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved August 25, 2019 from .

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