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Copyright and Fair Use: Blind Men Describing the Elephant
PROCEEDINGS

, Barat College of DePaul University, United States

Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference, in Nashville, Tennessee, USA ISBN 978-1-880094-44-0 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), Chesapeake, VA

Abstract

The “fair use” of documents secured from the Internet for educational use has historical precedents dating back centuries. Indeed, the concepts of ownership of intellectual property have been sharply debated since the invention of movable print. Fair use can be defined based on the purpose, nature, and amount of material accessed, and on the economic impact of the use of the material. Various scholastic organizations have implemented policies to define fair use and to make the Internet useful to scholars, but fair to the authors of documents. New technologies are now available to ensure copyright compliance

Citation

Wells, L. (2002). Copyright and Fair Use: Blind Men Describing the Elephant. In D. Willis, J. Price & N. Davis (Eds.), Proceedings of SITE 2002--Society for Information Technology & Teacher Education International Conference (pp. 317-318). Nashville, Tennessee, USA: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 18, 2019 from .

Keywords

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