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The Role of Students' Cognitive Engagement in Online Learning
ARTICLE

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American Journal of Distance Education Volume 20, Number 1, ISSN 0892-3647

Abstract

This study investigated the degree to which students cognitively engage with their online courses. Cognitive engagement was defined as the integration and utilization of students' motivations and strategies in the course of their learning. Given this, the study utilized J. B. Biggs's (1987a) Study Process Questionnaire to measure motivations and strategies in general, rather than for a specific task. Statistically significant findings were observed for program focus, gender, age, and prior online experience in accordance with students' learning strategies and motivations. Specifically, the findings indicate that as students gain experience with online learning, they come to take more responsibility for their own learning. The findings have implications for how instructors facilitate online courses as well as how designers organize online courses.

Citation

Richardson, J.C. & Newby, T. (2006). The Role of Students' Cognitive Engagement in Online Learning. American Journal of Distance Education, 20(1), 23-37. Retrieved March 23, 2019 from .

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