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How Academics Use Technology in Teaching and Learning: Understanding the Relationship between Beliefs and Practice
ARTICLE

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Journal of Computer Assisted Learning Volume 22, Number 2, ISSN 1365-2729 Publisher: Wiley

Abstract

This paper reports on a detailed investigation into the beliefs and practices of teachers in 22 computer-assisted learning projects in Australia in the mid-1990s. Detailed interview data were obtained, supported by the project software and other curriculum materials. The interview transcripts and documentary material were collated and condensed into rich descriptions; these were then coded on a number of belief and practice dimensions. The resulting profiles were clustered into five belief-practice categories: thoughtful instructors, pre-emptive professionals, conversational constructivists, learning facilitators and situated knowledge negotiators. These complex, yet interpretable, patterns of relationships between beliefs and practices are useful in understanding teachers' reluctance to change their teaching, one instance of which is the relatively limited uptake of technology in higher education.

Citation

Bain, J.D. & McNaught, C. (2006). How Academics Use Technology in Teaching and Learning: Understanding the Relationship between Beliefs and Practice. Journal of Computer Assisted Learning, 22(2), 99-113. Wiley. Retrieved July 11, 2020 from .

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