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Scaffolding the Appropriation of Self-Regulatory Activity: A Socio-Cultural Analysis of Changes in Teacher-Student Discourse about a Graduate Research Portfolio ARTICLE

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ISAIJLS Volume 33, Number 5, ISSN 0020-4277

Abstract

This study informs the design and development of pedagogical agents that can flexibly support self-regulation by calibrating guidance to specific phases and facets of self-regulated learning (SRL) as individuals encounter challenges and develop more sophisticated understandings of the task and content. From a socio-cultural perspective of self-regulation, we examine the transition of self-regulatory control from teacher to graduate student during naturalistic instructional conferences. Three goals included (a) examining teacher-student dialogue about a complex task to see if fading actually occurs, (b) examining whether support and fading of support are calibrated to specific phases of the self-regulatory process at a given point in time, and (c) examining techniques used for scaffolding and fading scaffolding directed toward specific phases and facets (behavioral, cognitive, meta-cognitive and motivational) of the self-regulatory cycle. Findings support a socio-cultural perspective of SLR demonstrating a transition from teacher to student regulation across phases and facets of SRL. The paper concludes with an examination of how our findings can inform the design of computer-based scaffolds that can support SRL.

Citation

Hadwin, A.F., Wozney, L. & Pontin, O. (2005). Scaffolding the Appropriation of Self-Regulatory Activity: A Socio-Cultural Analysis of Changes in Teacher-Student Discourse about a Graduate Research Portfolio. Instructional Science: An International Journal of the Learning Sciences, 33(5), 413-450. Retrieved December 13, 2017 from .

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