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Video Perspectivity Meets Wild and Crazy Teens: A Design Ethnography
ARTICLE

Cambridge Journal of Education Volume 34, Number 2, ISSN 0305-764X

Abstract

This article is a digital video design ethnography describing the first phase of introducing a perspectivity meme into a classroom. A meme is an idea that spreads throughout a system. A perspectivity meme is the idea that people who share their viewpoints and interpretations will gradually affect role changes in the learning environment. They will not only 'see' each other's points of view, but also share roles and viewpoints. Digital video technology is the medium that enables the perspectivity meme to spread throughout this learning culture. Educators and junior high school students use digital cameras and computers to record, reflect, present, discuss, and debate. In this description, I present a detailed narrative of a day in the life of learners, a teacher, and three researchers. I describe how a perspectivity meme was planted in a culture. I describe how the community began to think more deeply and personally about the curriculum. In closing, I discuss the importance of sharing roles in the learning and teaching process, thereby activating incremental changes to the learning environment. ORION, an experimental tool for digital video analysis--previously known as WebConstellations and Constellations--is used to present interactive video data to readers of this article, on the web. ORION supports online collaborative organization, analysis, and presentation of video segments and clusters and can be used by researchers, teachers, and/or learners. Readers are invited to participate online at http://orion.njit.edu in the Burnsview Galaxy.

Citation

Goldman, R. (2004). Video Perspectivity Meets Wild and Crazy Teens: A Design Ethnography. Cambridge Journal of Education, 34(2), 157-178. Retrieved March 5, 2021 from .

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