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Effects of Collaborative and e-Learning on Skill Acquisition and Retention for Computer-based Cognitive Tasks
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, Feng Chia University, Taiwan

E-Learn: World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education, in Montreal, Canada ISBN 978-1-880094-46-4 Publisher: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE), San Diego, CA

Abstract

Based on a training program using a production system simulation software designed for the Theory of Constraint (TOC), the effects of collaborative training and after-training feedback representation method on skill acquisition and skill retention are investigated. An experiment with two training protocol, individual and triplet; two methods to present after-training lecture, face-to-face with the instructor and digitized video image; and three skill retention levels, immediately upon the completion of the training, after one week, and after one month were conducted. The results show that training protocol affects both training performance and skill retention (p<0.01) while methods to present after-training lecture affect training performance (p<0.05). The results suggest the media selection and instruction representation need to be carefully designed for e-learning environment. Directly transplant the courseware used for face-to-face environment may cause underachievement at training.

Citation

Tang, K.H. (2002). Effects of Collaborative and e-Learning on Skill Acquisition and Retention for Computer-based Cognitive Tasks. In M. Driscoll & T. Reeves (Eds.), Proceedings of E-Learn 2002--World Conference on E-Learning in Corporate, Government, Healthcare, and Higher Education (pp. 2261-2264). Montreal, Canada: Association for the Advancement of Computing in Education (AACE). Retrieved March 5, 2021 from .

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